Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Scoutmaster Qualifications

Most of my blog posts occur to me in the shower. This is one of those.

So, your ward is in need of a new Scoutmaster.* Whom to choose? May I offer the following as qualifying characteristics and attributes for your candidates:

  • A Scoutmaster is Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful, Friendly, Courteous, Kind, Obedient, Cheerful, Thrifty, Brave, Clean and Reverent. 
  • A Scoutmaster does his duty to God and his Country and lives by the above list; he is always ready and willing to help others; he exemplifies physical fitness and a mental alertness, and keeps his covenants; in short, he personifies what we want our sons to be, both inside and out.
  • His Testimony of the Savior and His gospel is firm; he has (or will give) the time to dedicate to the nurturing of boys; he’s willing to learn his responsibilities and get the training necessary to learn those things he doesn’t already know (and already knows that he knows very little); he’s willing to go for the long haul and obtain the tenure necessary to have a lasting effect 
  • A Scoutmaster loves the boys and young men, and delights in watching them interact, explore and learn, all while facilitating and encouraging that learning from the sidelines
  • Already being an outdoorsman is a bonus, but those skills can be learned by anyone who meets the above. This is NOT the primary qualification, but it is a skill to be (quickly) acquired
  • Helpful: owning a truck and/or trailer and Dutch oven.

*Or Varsity Coach, Venture Adviser, 11YO ASM, even Cubmaster or Webelos Den Leader 
It now occurs to me that this is a good counterpoint to my essay, "What to find out before accepting a Scouting calling."

Prepared. | For Life.™

2 comments:

Brian Reyman said...

Good list. I'd add:
- Has the time to dedicate to weekly troop meetings, monthly campouts, monthly roundtables (add other responsibilities that may apply to the spiritual side - depending on the nature of the calling).
- Is willing to take and follow the counsel in the necessary training.

Tory said...

Great list. I think one of the problems we have when we call scout leaders in the church is that the person issuing the call doesn't know that these things are important, or they don't know what training is required or available. They get asked a question about the responsibilities and the answer is too often something like "I don't know. Go talk to the previous scout leader." or "just take them camping and you'll do fine."